John Hoover

Amid historic budget crisis at Oklahoma, Bob Stoops, rest of Sooners athletic department still thriving

Amid historic budget crisis at Oklahoma, Bob Stoops, rest of Sooners athletic department still thriving
Stoops sideline

Oklahoma’s Bob Stoops’ new contract will pay him an average of $6.0125 million per year.

Just call Bob Stoops the Six Million Dollar Man.

Salary increases for Stoops and all the University of Oklahoma football coaches were approved at Tuesday’s meeting of the OU board of regents, and Stoops’ contract was extended through 2021. His average annual salary over the lifetime of the contract is now $6.0125 million.

Offensive coordinator Lincoln Riley got the biggest raise among OU’s assistants, from $500,000 to $900,000 a year — making him the highest-paid offensive coordinator in the Big 12 Conference. Riley and defensive coordinator Mike Stoops each got a contract extension through 2018.

Offensive line coach Bill Bedenbaugh got a $40,000 annual raise, while wide receivers coach Dennis Simmons got a bump of $37,000. Inside receivers coach Cale Gundy, defensive backs coach Kerry Cooks, linebackers coach Tim Kish and special teams coordinator and running backs coach Jay Boulware each received a $25,000 increase.

Other OU coaches also received raises this year.

Men’s basketball coach Lon Kruger got a $50,000 increase and an extension through 2021.

Three national championship-winning coaches — softball coach Patty Gasso, men’s gymnastics coach Mark Williams and women’s gymnastics coach K.J. Kindler — each received a $5,000 annual raise, and Gasso’s contract was extended through 2021.

OU president David Boren, citing a significant decrease in state appropriations, said the school will raise tuition and fees by 7 percent for the 2016-17 academic year and called it “the most critical budget crisis in the history of the university.” The board approved its fiscal-year operating budget of about $1 billion, which include the reduction of about 300 jobs — many of those coming through a voluntary retirement incentive program.

At worst, Tuesday’s headlines may seem like the school’s priorities are out of whack. At best, it comes off as bad optics.

But Oklahoma remains one of just a handful of schools nationwide whose athletic department is funded independently of state money. So while the school’s operating budget is in a financial crunch, the OU athletic department — aided by the Sooner Club, a fundraising arm entirely separate from the university — is able to give back significant money to the school each year. This year’s contributions from the athletic department to the general university fund are expected to be in excess of $8 million.

Stoops’ previous contract paid him an average of $5.7 million per year.

 

Inside Bob Stoops’ new contract

(6 years/$36.075 million)

  • 2016

Base: $325,000

Additional/outside income: $4.525 million

Stay bonus: $700,000

Total: $5.55 million

  • 2017

Base: $325,000

Additional/outside income: $4.7 million

Stay bonus: $700,000

Total: $5.725 million

  • 2018

Base: $325,000

Additional/outside income: $4.875 million

Stay bonus: $700,000

Total: $5.9 million

  • 2019

Base: $325,000

Additional/outside income: $5.075 million

Stay bonus: $700,000

Total: $6.1 million

  • 2020

Base: $325,000

Additional/outside income: $5.275 million

Stay bonus: $700,000

Total: $6.3 million

  • 2021

Base: $325,000

Additional/outside income: $5.475 million

Stay bonus: $700,000

Total: $6.5 million

John Hoover

Hoover wrote for the Tulsa World for 24 years before joining The Franchise, where he's now co-host of "Further Review" on The Franchise Tulsa (weekdays 12-3, fm107.9/am1270) . In his time at the World, Hoover won numerous writing and reporting awards, including in 2011 National Beat Writer of the Year from the Associated Press Sports Editors for his work covering the Oklahoma Sooners. Hoover also covered Oklahoma State, Arkansas, Oral Roberts and the NFL as a beat writer. From 2012 to 2016, Hoover was the World's lead sports columnist. As a columnist, Hoover won national awards in 2012 and 2014 from the National Athletic Trainers Association for reporting on sports medicine and in 2015 won first place in sports columns from the Oklahoma Society of Professional Journalists. After receiving a journalism degree from East Central University, Hoover worked at newspapers in Ada, Okmulgee, Tahlequah and Waynesville, Mo. He played football at Ada High School and grew up in North Pole, Alaska. Hoover and his family live in Broken Arrow.

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